Faith Under Fire
Alan Hustak

If Frederick Scott is remembered at all today, it is as minor Victorian poet or as the father of his illustrious son F.R. Scott. However, Frederick Scott was almost 55 years old and the pastor of St. Matthews Anglican Church in Quebec City when he volunteered to go overseas to serve as senior chaplain with the 1st Canadian Infantry Division during the First World War. The depth of his faith was tested when he lost a son at the Battle of the Somme. Through a series of unpublished letters in the McCord Museum, author Alan Hustak tells the powerful and absorbing story of a man revered by the Canadian military for his remarkable ministry. One admiring private recalled, “No matter how thick the fight, he is always to be seen wherever the boys are. … to see men dying all around you, all dying for principle, it hardens a man, and at the same times softens him.’ His letters home from the front reveals how Scott discovered first-hand what fear really is, how to conquer it and how to inspire others.
Island of Trees
Bronwyn Chester

By following the trail of 50 trees, Bronwyn Chester presents a new perspective on the island of Montreal and offers a sense of belonging to an ancient forest, in its modern form. She goes beyond the traits defining each tree and interprets the tree's story. Each story is complemented with an illustration by Jean-Luc Trudel of the tree being discussed. The Island of Montreal has its own unique ecosystem. Insulated all around by the St. Lawrence River and the Rivière des Prairies, the island is slightly warmer than the surrounding territory, allowing species such as the giant cottonwood poplars to thrive all along the shoreline, and exotic species, such as the black walnut, tulip tree and dawn redwood to compliment the wide variety of native trees.

Bronwyn Chester wrote the weekly column Island of Trees for the Montreal Gazette and this book is an expansion of those columns. Grouped by territory, the trees selected will provide Montrealers and visitors the opportunity to not only better know and appreciate Montreal's trees, but will also lead them to little known places and histories of their island. These are stories that anchor us in time and space. Old trees connect us to the past as witnesses of bygone eras.
Demonic to Divine
Shulamis Yelin

A writer’s lifelong battle with mental illness.


Demonic to Divine: The Double Life of Shulamis Yelin is a weaving of the Montreal writer’s stories and selected diary excerpts and family photographs revealing a far-reaching creative personality who is haunted from the age of ten by the “moods taking over”.

This book poignantly illuminates the dramatic duality of a public and private literary and emotional life through published and unpublished stories of an idyllic Montreal Jewish childhood contrasted with deeply troubled and often shocking diary entries that document the author’s lifelong battle with mental illness.

Yelin’s insightful yet light and humorous stories have been cherished by generations of children and adults for their universal appeal. The journal entries that she maintained for most of her 90 years document the abuse, paranoia, self-loathing, doubt and devastating depression of Yelin’s true emotional state. These concurrent lenses reveal the profound struggles and suffering of a fascinating and highly gifted woman who transcended her ongoing deep-seated emotional agony to create a significant literary legacy.

The many threads of this multi-layered book have been woven together though the collaboration of Yelin’s daughter, Gilah Yelin Hirsch and Yelin’s first stories’ editor, Nancy Marrelli.
The Long November
James Benson Nablo

It descends with a challenge upon the censors, and yet this powerful story had to be told, for it is so much a part of a struggling, impetuous generation of youth in Canada. It is sometimes brazen, sometimes explosive, always face to face with gripping reality, shocking as that may be to those who shy away from life’s more lurid facets.
- from the first paperback edition

First published in 1946, The Long November enjoyed six different editions in nine years, making it one of the best selling Canadian novels of the post-war period. Its last appearance, as a pirated paperback, speaks to its reputation as a gritty, raw and ribald story that few publishers dared touch. This new edition is the first in sixty-seven years.

The Long November is the story Joe Mack, son of the grittier side of Cataract City – Niagara Falls – and his struggles to make something of himself; all for the love of well-to-do blonde beauty Steffie Gibson. It’s about rum running booze, Chicago beer trucks, Bay Street sharpshooters, the mines of Northern Ontario and fighting the Nazis in Italy. It’s also about the women, the many women - married, unmarried and widowed – who shares Joe’s bed. But they mean nothing – it’s Steffie he wants.
Of Jesuits and Bohemians
Jean-Claude Germain

Jean-Claude Germain’s second volume of Montreal memoirs chronicles his coming of age: his draconian Jesuit education on the fringes of the city’s Red Light District, followed by his liberating discovery of the city’s fevered bohemian community in the dying days of the Duplessis regime and Quebec’s “grande noirceur.” Here, on the cusp between two worlds, we meet fire-breathing clerics intent on putting the fear of God into young souls, and writers, painters, theatre directors and performers, determined at all costs, and at great sacrifice, to transform the society in which they live. It is this creative ferment that instils in the young Jean-Claude a passion for and a belief in artistic endeavour that will sustain him through all the years that lie in wait.
Press

On Dog Ear:
“There is a lot to admire in Patternicity: musicality, intelligence, toughness, tensile juxtapositions of rational enquiry and lyrical tenderness.”—Arc Poetry Magazine

On Demonic to Divine:
“Fraught with rage and admiration and bewilderment, a daughter reaches the through the pages of time to heroically attempt to fathom her mother.  Shulamis Yelin, was both a successful writer and a mentally ill mother.  In this fascinating book, her daughter searches for understanding with fluctuating compassion . . . and finds love. –Michele Zackheim, author of Last Train to Paris

On Satisfying Clicking Sound:
"Poet and critic Jason Guriel solidifies his place in CanLit with substantial contributions to both fields. . . Most of Guriel's poems open outward, including insight, mischief and wordplay." –Quill & Quire

News

Congratulations to Esplanade author, Guillaume Morissette. His novel New Tab is shortlisted for the 2014 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Our colleague Kitty Lewis at Brick Books receives Honourary Life Membership Award from the League of Canadian Poets.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Fall 2014 Titles
Check out our new catalogue for Fall 2014!

Winkler wins 2013 Governor General's Literary Award!
Marston wins 2013 Ottawa Book Award!
Congratulations to Donald Winkler winner of the GG Translation prize for The Major Verbs by Pierre Nepveu,and to Missy Marston, winner of the Ottawa Book Award for Fiction for her novel The Love Monster.

Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).