The Gang of Four
Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan

The nightmare began on a warm summer night. A six-year-old boy was found in a park shack, bludgeoned to death in the quiet residential district of Montreal's Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. Soon after, an eight-year-old boy disappeared. Horror and fear gripped the city. Neighbourhoods went silent. Suspects were questioned, suspicion and alarm mounts. No arrests were ever made.

When Lieutenant Detective Damiano discovers the cold case many years later and learns that the three suspects are still alive, she's hooked, on what cops call a Detective's Case. Her partner, Detective Pierre Matte, hesitantly agrees to work with her. They meet Kathryn Flynn, the ninety-year-old mother, who has kept meticulous files throughout the years--her hope has never faltered. Damiano and Matte rediscover what binds them, a reckoning for the murderers among us and justice for the victims who have no voice.
Dominoes at the Crossroads
Kaie Kellough

In Dominoes at the Crossroads Kaie Kellough maps an alternate nation—one populated by Caribbean Canadians who hopscotch across the country. The characters navigate race, class, and coming-of-age. Seeking opportunity, some fade into the world around them, even as their minds hitchhike, dream, and soar. Some appear in different times and hemispheres, whether as student radicals, secret agents, historians, fugitive slaves, or jazz musicians.

From the cobblestones of Montreal’s Old Port through the foliage of a South American rainforest; from a basement in wartime Paris to a metro in Montréal during the October Crisis; Kellough’s fierce imagination reconciles the personal and ancestral experience with the present moment, grappling with the abiding feeling of being elsewhere, even when here.
Afterwords
Geoffrey Cook

The belief in translation as an act of self-portraiture drives Afterwords, Geoffrey Cook's ambitious reimagining of German poems by Goethe, Heine, Rilke and Brecht. Cook's versions not only transform these foreign texts into English poems in their own right, but enrich and expand his uniquely prismatic voice. Cook brings a contemporary and Canadian tone to his adaptations, which also showcase the exacting craftsmanship for which his first collection, Postscript, was praised. Afterwords is a book that daringly celebrates authorship as a shared project. "Do you not feel," writes Goethe, "that, in my songs, I am one and the other, too?"
No Place More Suitable
John Kalbfleisch

For centuries Montreal reigned as Canada’s most beguiling city. Inspired by the pages of the Gazette, Canada’s oldest daily newspaper (founded in 1778), here are seventy-five true tales to inspire, amuse, horrify and captivate. Stories include humourist Stephen Leacock’s flinty bitterness at being forced into academic retirement; a boat race through downtown Montreal in the dead of winter; a duel sparked by a society ball; and city-wide celebrations marking the end of World War II. In No Place More Suitable, author John Kalbfleisch brings into colourful focus the full range of human endeavor, genius, hilarity, poignancy and sadness from over 350 years of life on the banks of the St. Lawrence.
The Suicide's Son
James Arthur

“I believe in the power of original sin,” writes James Arthur, “in the wound/ that keeps on wounding.” Set against a backdrop of political turmoil in the United States, The Suicide’s Son is about the complicated personal histories that parents inherit, add to, and pass on to their children. This is a confessional book of masks and personae, of depopulated landscapes haunted by history’s violence, of speakers whose conflicted truth-telling is marked by sense of complicity in the falsehoods they glimpse around them. “I’m aging very slowly, because every part of me / is already dead," says Frankenstein’s monster. With his formidable powers of observation and inimitable ear for the cadences of speech, Arthur shows himself to be, in only his second book, one of the best English-language poets writing today.
Press

On Aphelia:
If it’s true that the young inhabit their own world, then novels about urban youth can feel like dispatches from a foreign country even when they’re set in your own neighbourhood. Mikella Nicol’s Aphelia, a cause célèbre on its original 2017 French publication, follows the ups and downs — mostly downs — of a 20-something graveyard-shift worker at a call centre during a summer heat wave as she attempts to recover from the messy end of a volatile relationship. If you’ve found your views on millennials piqued and enriched by Geneviève Pettersen and Guillaume Morissette, Nicol looks like the natural next thing. - Ian McGillis, Montreal Gazette

On
What We Carry:
These are beautifully written, intelligent, accessible poems. - Cary Fagan, Writers' Trust Newsletter

On
Four Days:
"Buell... delights readers with vivid descriptions of English Montreal in the early 1960s—its Irish mobsters, aristocratic Westmount denizens, the city's affluence and its under-belly.... Véhicule Press has done a great service in republishing Four Days

On The Suicide's Son:
The poems in James Arthur’s new collection, The Suicide’s Son, convey a mastery of resonance and form...irony and playfulness. - Cora Sire, Montreal Review of Books

News

#NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay
Zebedee Nungak: “The need to correct the forced imposition of extinguishment and surrender of Aboriginal rights to establish agreements between governments and Indigenous peoples is still outstanding, unfinished business.” bit.ly/2ZxVFHm

BRAVO ROBIN
We're chuffed that Robin Richardson won the 2019 Trillium Book Award for her poetry collection Sit How You Want. Kudos also to her Signal Editions editor, Carmine Starnino.

FOUNDER OF POETRY SERIES HONOURED BY MCGILL
Michael Harris was given an Honorary Doctorate (D.Litt., honoris causa) by McGill University on June 3rd, in the main for his contribution to the world of poetry as founder/editor of the Signal Editions poetry imprint of Vehicule Press.

KUDOS TO OUR SIGNAL POETS
Laura Ritland’s debut collection, East and West, has been nominated for the 2019 Pat Lowther Memorial Prize and Robin Richardson’s Sit How You Want for the 2019 Trillium Book Award.THATS A LOT OF CANDLES!
2018 was our 45th anniversary. The publishing landscape has changed substantially since we began printing in the back of an artist-run gallery in downtown Montreal in 1973. Older, and perhaps wiser, we've changed too, but our commitment to Canadian writers and writing has remained constant. Here are some pictures from the anniversary celebration: Part One & Part Two
Discover

Mary Dalton, Poet Laureate of St. John's NL, reads poems from Red Ledger on the Flahoolic podcast: "Leo" & "Ship Inn" and "Cape Spear" & "The Boat".

Listen to Zebedee Nungak, Ulrikke S. Gernes, and Morten Stroksnes discuss the meaning of North on CBC Ideas.

Available together for the first time—all twelve books from the Ricochet Books series. Buy the Ricochet Bundle and collect all twelve riveting noir novels for 120$.

Listen to Elaine Kalman Naves in conversation with Nigel Beale. Robert Weaver, Godfather of Canadian Literature.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).