I Am Not Guilty
Frances Shelley Wees

Set in and around post-war Toronto, I Am Not Guilty first appeared in a condensed form in the February 1954 Ladies’ Home Journal.

That same year, it was published in full by Doubleday as M’Lord, I Am Not Guilty. This Ricochet Books edition marks the first new edition since 1967.

Helen Graham has been acquitted in the murder of her wealthy husband, Alberta oil baron Steven Graham, but the eyes of the public continue to view her with suspicion. Worried for her future, and that of her young son, she sets out to find the true killer. The trail leads to the apartment of another woman—and revelations about her dead husband’s secret life—then continues to a growing bedroom community in suburban Toronto. What the widow doesn’t realize is that she is not alone in her pursuit of the murderer or how ready that murderer is to kill again.
Little Housewolf
Medrie Purdham

Medrie Purdham's Little Housewolf delves deeply into the world of domestic miniatures, a realm where thimbles, baby teeth, push pins, keyholes, teacups, and wedding rings become meticulously realized scale models of one’s terrors and joys. Purdham uses the fine-grained signatures of her poetry—close observation, exact detail, precise sounds—not only to examine childhood and its fascination with size and scale, but also to measure herself against the larger, untamed landscapes she feels increasingly alienated from (“It is all anachronism, / grasses vintage wild"). Marked by bold emotion and arresting imagery, Little Housewolf is a brilliant debut.
Fathers at Hockey
Richard Sanger

“Richard Sanger’s new book begins with father and son depart­ing on the mythic early morning quest and then plunges us into the dirty realism of the rink. There are skittish pucks, ancient Sherwoods, inappropriate mums, elaborate excuses for losers (and Leafs), the rink as blank slate or the genetic showcase kids can’t escape. The key theme is the way we use stories to explain reality—including the games we lose—to ourselves, and our children.” — Linda Hutcheon

“Richard Sanger’s Fathers at Hockey is a brilliant and accurate evocation of the unique world dads and their kids enter when they find ice, outdoors or in. It’s all here, the bad coffee, aching cold, throat-catching moments of desperate hope and prayer.” — Roy Macgregor

“How does he encompass so much—from the numinous mystery of ice to a rink side chat with Umberto Eco—in a clutch of relaxed, mind-stretching, gut-punching poems about taking your kid to his games? I love this collection.” — Rick Salutin

Fathers at Hockey shows Richard Sanger at the top of his game: formally inventive and various, eloquent, unsentimental, funny, unconventionally beautiful. Everything this reader looks for in poetry.” — Steven Heighton.

A Signal Editions Chapbook.

Kathy Dobson Bundle
Kathy Dobson

Our March bundle features Kathy Dobson's two searing memoirs With a Closed Fist: Growing up in Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood and Punching and Kicking: Leaving Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood for $30 plus $6 flat rate shipping in Canada. These books recount the challenges of growing up in, and eventually leaving, Point Saint Charles, once an industrial working-class neighbourhood, now in the throes of gentrification.

Praise for Kathy Dobson's books:

"Dobson has enormous talent, and we all must be thankful that she did beat the odds and find her way through the maze of deprivation and violence to speak her truths in such a creative and telling book." – Pat Capponi, Globe and Mail

"It reads like fiction... younger Kathy's voice is strikingly believable: candid, scornful, funny" – Anna Leventhal, Montreal Review of Books

"Kathy Dobson vividly gives us a surprisingly clear glimpse through a child's eyes of what it is like to live in poverty. Her language rings true as it portrays lives of people struggling every day and night with the physical, economic, emotional and political assaults of poverty and its constant humiliations. This is a rare insider expose." – Linda Savory Gordon, Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Community Development and Social Work, Algoma University

"This is as authentic a description, language and all, of life in the Point during the 60s and 70s as it is possible to get. Poverty, hunger, love, abuse, ingenuity, survival, intelligence, language wars— they are all there; fierce optimism and laugh-out-loud humour carry the story along. That is the way it was. I know , I was there." – Nicolas Steinmetz, MD

"In a place between the profound and the profane, lives a raw, unapologetic, and funny voice of Kathy Dobson. In an honest and harrowing account of poverty, she tells a powerful story of resilience of a girl turned woman." – Merlyna Lim, Canada Research Chair, Carleton University
Nectarine
Chad Campbell

Memory—how we retrieve and replenish it—is at the heart of Nectarine, Chad Campbell's visionary second collection. Figures, cities, and landscapes from the author's life shift in and out of these dreamlike poems that explore the “unaccountable, uncountable” ways in which our past keeps speaking to us: through objects, through paintings, through colours, and through the spectre of places that map themselves over the places we live in. Subtle, unsettling, compressed, and full of incandescently beautiful language, Nectarine is about lost things, stranded moments, and traces preserved in time like “a glass of frozen nectarine halves / on a table made of ice.”
Press

On No Grave for This Place:
“This intense collection, which unfolds around loss and decay, finds its most beautiful embodiment in the precision of its gaze.” –Le Devoir

On Nectarine:
"Imagine an image hitting the eye with rapid-fire description, as if it were projected through a television that allowed the viewer to delight in the flicker of each frame. This is the technique Campbell favors." –Jim Johnstone, Carousel

On I Am Not Guilty:
“A vivid and arresting novel of suspense, cleverly portraying the story of average human beings caught in the toils of murder.” – Ottawa Citizen

On The Geography of Pluto:
“(The) book is so sharply written and so full of insights into the human condition… DiRaddo has crafted a fine book about one young gay man’s struggle to realize his first big relationship really is over while holding his mother’s hand as she struggles through a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Set in Montreal’s gay milieu in the 1990s, The Geography of Pluto

News

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, it's the publication of Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way! It's also National Poetry Month, so we are offering a Bundle of two new books, Little Housewolf by Medrie Purdham and Nectarine by Chad Campbell! Plus we welcome Carmine Starnino as our new Associate Publisher!

MARCH NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month we are featuring an autobiographical bundle by Kathy Dobson, and get a sneak peek of Medrie Perdham's forthcoming poetry debut Little Housewolf (out in May!)

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We celebrate Black History Month with the launch of Book of Wings by Tawhida Tanya Evanson and a special bundle of Book of Wings and Dominoes at the Crossroads.

JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We launch Book of Wings by Tawhida Tanya Evanson; plus our Spring 2021 lineup and our Lockdown Fiction Bundle!DOMINOES AT THE CROSSROADS wins QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction!
Congratulations to Kaie Kellough on winning the QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction for his book Dominoes at the Crossroads! The jury commented: "...Nubian slaves, an auction at The Ritz, and an insider’s inside view of uncelebrated neighborhoods in a “future history” of Montreal that tangles a language-obsessed
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).