What We Carry
Susan Glickman

What We Carry is a profound exploration of the weight of human history at three levels: the individual, the cultural, and environmental. From her brilliant “Extinction Sonnets”—odes to various disappearing species—to a spirited examination of everyday salutations, Susan Glickman’s range astonishes: ice storms, sugar maples, early love on the Orient Express, an archaeological dig at Mycenae. Serious but not solemn, full of linguistic and imagistic playfulness, the collection is anchored by poetic translations of Chopin’s 24 Preludes, opus 28—his most experimental and characteristic compositions. The intimacy of Chopin’s project has inspired sound-rich poems that, once again, prove Glickman’s gift for capturing the frailty of human connections in a damaged world. “First light and the last, / first love and the last.”
Exploring Old Montreal
Alan Hustak

Old Montreal, not far from the city centre, is a historic neighbourhood in transition alive with raw energy. A compact area where the city was founded in 1642, it is today packed with museums, churches, galleries, restaurants, boutiques, boutique hotels, and entertainment venues.

A tourist destination in any season, the ambiance of its squares and waterfront park is determinedly romantic. Whether you want to ride a giant ferris wheel, go skating in winter, view dazzling fireworks from an illuminated bridge in summer, or just explore its narrow cobblestone streets to soak up four centuries of history in Vieux-Montréal, this book is indispensable.

This walking tour pocket guide is a complete revision of the bestseller published for the city’s 375th anniversary, which was recommended by Report on Business as “the perfect guidebook.”
The Damned and The Destroyed
Kenneth Orvis

‘God help us, Dent – the thing is, my daughter has become a dope fiend.’

Maxwell Dent studied law at McGill and served in the RCAF and Intelligence M-5 during the Korean War. For a private investigator, he’s as respectable as they come. No wonder then that it’s Dent Huntley Ashton summons to his Westmount mansion. A respected captain of industry, the wealthy man knows the PI can be relied upon to be discreet.

Ashton’s daughter Helen has fallen into heroin addiction, and the millionaire wants Dent to smash the ring supplying her vice, just as he took down a ring operating in Korea.

Set in 1954, the novel captures the dying days of Montreal’s reputation as one of the world’s great sin cities. The Damned and the Destroyed was published in 1962 by McClelland & Stewart in Canada and Dennis Dobson in the UK; this Ricochet Books edition marks the first print edition in more than five decades.
The Hope That Remains
Christine Macgill

Every immigrant that comes to Canada has a story. This book captures ten of those stories and the remarkable resiliency and fortitude of the human spirit. In 1994 one of the worst genocides in human history took place in Rwanda—over one million people were killed in 100 days.

Each chapter in The Hope that Remains focuses on a Rwandan survivor and their journey to escape the violence and chaos that overtook their country. Two of the featured stories follow individuals who fled before the killing began and the events that caused them to flee. Both were then faced with the challenge of being outsiders looking in as events deteriorated and their families were slaughtered. The other eight survivors share their detailed and gripping experiences of trying to stay alive while trapped in a nation of killers.
Twenty-five years after the Rwandan Genocide the scars are still very real and rebuilding and coping with the trauma remains an emotional struggle. Despite their horrific pasts the survivors share feelings of hope, forgiveness, and a belief in a better future. They demonstrate the strength and courage it takes to leave the known behind to seek a better life in a new country. Their journeys to Canada contain humorous moments, thoughtful insights, and an overwhelming love and pride for the nation they now call home.
The Suicide's Son
James Arthur

“I believe in the power of original sin,” writes James Arthur, “in the wound/ that keeps on wounding.” Set against a backdrop of political turmoil in the United States, The Suicide’s Son is about the complicated personal histories that parents inherit, add to, and pass on to their children. This is a confessional book of masks and personae, of depopulated landscapes haunted by history’s violence, of speakers whose conflicted truth-telling is marked by sense of complicity in the falsehoods they glimpse around them. “I’m aging very slowly, because every part of me / is already dead," says Frankenstein’s monster. With his formidable powers of observation and inimitable ear for the cadences of speech, Arthur shows himself to be, in only his second book, one of the best English-language poets writing today.
Press

On Aphelia:
If it’s true that the young inhabit their own world, then novels about urban youth can feel like dispatches from a foreign country even when they’re set in your own neighbourhood. Mikella Nicol’s Aphelia, a cause célèbre on its original 2017 French publication, follows the ups and downs — mostly downs — of a 20-something graveyard-shift worker at a call centre during a summer heat wave as she attempts to recover from the messy end of a volatile relationship. If you’ve found your views on millennials piqued and enriched by Geneviève Pettersen and Guillaume Morissette, Nicol looks like the natural next thing. - Ian McGillis, Montreal Gazette

On
The Gang of Four:
Praise for Where Bodies Fall

On The Suicide's Son:
The poems in James Arthur’s new collection, The Suicide’s Son, convey a mastery of resonance and form...irony and playfulness. - Cora Sire, Montreal Review of Books

On
What We Carry:
These are beautifully written, intelligent, accessible poems. - Cary Fagan, Writers' Trust Newsletter

News

#NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay
Zebedee Nungak: “The need to correct the forced imposition of extinguishment and surrender of Aboriginal rights to establish agreements between governments and Indigenous peoples is still outstanding, unfinished business.” bit.ly/2ZxVFHm

BRAVO ROBIN
We're chuffed that Robin Richardson won the 2019 Trillium Book Award for her poetry collection Sit How You Want. Kudos also to her Signal Editions editor, Carmine Starnino.

FOUNDER OF POETRY SERIES HONOURED BY MCGILL
Michael Harris was given an Honorary Doctorate (D.Litt., honoris causa) by McGill University on June 3rd, in the main for his contribution to the world of poetry as founder/editor of the Signal Editions poetry imprint of Vehicule Press.

KUDOS TO OUR SIGNAL POETS
Laura Ritland’s debut collection, East and West, has been nominated for the 2019 Pat Lowther Memorial Prize and Robin Richardson’s Sit How You Want for the 2019 Trillium Book Award.THATS A LOT OF CANDLES!
2018 was our 45th anniversary. The publishing landscape has changed substantially since we began printing in the back of an artist-run gallery in downtown Montreal in 1973. Older, and perhaps wiser, we've changed too, but our commitment to Canadian writers and writing has remained constant. Here are some pictures from the anniversary celebration: Part One & Part Two
Discover

Mary Dalton, Poet Laureate of St. John's NL, reads poems from Red Ledger on the Flahoolic podcast: "Leo" & "Ship Inn" and "Cape Spear" & "The Boat".

Listen to Zebedee Nungak, Ulrikke S. Gernes, and Morten Stroksnes discuss the meaning of North on CBC Ideas.

Available together for the first time—all twelve books from the Ricochet Books series. Buy the Ricochet Bundle and collect all twelve riveting noir novels for 120$.

Listen to Elaine Kalman Naves in conversation with Nigel Beale. Robert Weaver, Godfather of Canadian Literature.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).