Kathy Dobson Bundle
Kathy Dobson

Our March bundle features Kathy Dobson's two searing memoirs With a Closed Fist: Growing up in Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood and Punching and Kicking: Leaving Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood for $30 plus $6 flat rate shipping in Canada. These books recount the challenges of growing up in, and eventually leaving, Point Saint Charles, once an industrial working-class neighbourhood, now in the throes of gentrification.

Praise for Kathy Dobson's books:

"Dobson has enormous talent, and we all must be thankful that she did beat the odds and find her way through the maze of deprivation and violence to speak her truths in such a creative and telling book." – Pat Capponi, Globe and Mail

"It reads like fiction... younger Kathy's voice is strikingly believable: candid, scornful, funny" – Anna Leventhal, Montreal Review of Books

"Kathy Dobson vividly gives us a surprisingly clear glimpse through a child's eyes of what it is like to live in poverty. Her language rings true as it portrays lives of people struggling every day and night with the physical, economic, emotional and political assaults of poverty and its constant humiliations. This is a rare insider expose." – Linda Savory Gordon, Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Community Development and Social Work, Algoma University

"This is as authentic a description, language and all, of life in the Point during the 60s and 70s as it is possible to get. Poverty, hunger, love, abuse, ingenuity, survival, intelligence, language wars— they are all there; fierce optimism and laugh-out-loud humour carry the story along. That is the way it was. I know , I was there." – Nicolas Steinmetz, MD

"In a place between the profound and the profane, lives a raw, unapologetic, and funny voice of Kathy Dobson. In an honest and harrowing account of poverty, she tells a powerful story of resilience of a girl turned woman." – Merlyna Lim, Canada Research Chair, Carleton University
Words are the Worst
Erik Lindner

Born in 1968 in The Hague, Erik Lindner is one of the Netherland’s most acclaimed poets. Admired for a style that fuses simplicity with strangeness, Lindner builds his poems through a montage of descriptive images that, by fending off closure, generate extraordinary visionary power. Gathering together new work with a selection from his previous six collections, Words are the Worst offers a range of pleasures that have made him celebrated in his home country: an austere eloquence; a hard, unsparing precision; a restless and idiosyncratic eye. Best of all is how his intensely filmic observations transform haunted landscapes of windmills, birds, dogs and houseboats on canals into, as one critic put it, “Lindner-like” moments. Brilliantly translated by Francis R. Jones, with an introduction by Canadian poet David O’Meara, Words are the Worst introduces a leading Dutch voice to English readers.
The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020
Eli MacLaren et al.

Founded in 2010, the Montreal International Poetry Prize has established itself as a major event in contemporary poetry, both in Canada and around the world. The Montreal Prize Anthology 2020 explodes with talent, combining radiant vision with striking invention in form. The loss of a father finds equivalence in a tornado’s blowing an apartment open to the night sky. Sacred and profane images of a mother pile up in couplets, making a heap of gold. Family memory stirs in the dreamy measures of a sestina. Racial injustice is defied and reversed in the unflinching mirror of a palindromic poem. A doctor confesses her life work to be a striving to right the wrong done her father. These poems, a handful of the thousands submitted to the 2020 competition, were chosen for the lone virtue of their speaking directly to the reader, with conviction and with art.

In 2019, the founder of the Montreal Prize, Asa Boxer, transferred it to the Department of English at McGill University. A team of dedicated faculty and graduate students recruited a distinguished international jury, headed by Pulitzer-prize-winner Yusef Komunyakaa, to judge the entries. This book is the result.
Culture in Transit
Sherry Simon

Reflections on the art of literary translation.

Translators connect languages and landscapes, sparking conversations that enlarge our imagination. In Canada, where translation has had an especially important role to play, the nature of the connections has changed. These wide-ranging essays, by Canada’s most prominent translators, chart a journey that begins with the sharp divides of English and French in the 1970s and then confronts the much more complex explosion of identities today. Engaging with the politics of meaning but also with the creative role of the translator, these beautifully-written reflections illuminate a practice that is today finally receiving due recognition.

Contributors include Wayne Grady, Rhonda Mullins, Michelle Hartman, Erin Moure, Barbara Godard, Susanne de Lotbiničre-Harwood, Linda Gaboriau, Sheila Fischman, Kathy Mezei, Philip Stratford, Louise von Flotow, Ray Ellenwood, Betty Bednarski, William Findlay, David Homel, Jane Brierley, Katia Grubisic.

Culture in Transit was originally published in 1995. This edition, with a new introduction by Sherry Simon, has been revised, and expanded to include four new contributors to reflect changes in the translation scene over the last decades.
Hallelujah Time
Virginia Konchan

Hallelujah Time, Virgina Konchan’s third full-length poetry collection—and the first to appear in Canada—delivers up poetry that is unlike anything being written today. Specializing in fast-moving monologues that track the vagaries and divagations of a mind in action, Konchan cuts our most hallowed cultural institutions and constructions down to size. She bracingly confronts the contemporary need to constantly adjust our masks to appease impossible standards, and our desperate fear of having our true selves be seen and understood. Hallelujah Time embraces a dazzling mix of idioms, registers, and tones in poems that compress everything they know into aphoristic, hard-boiled insights as arresting as they are witty, theatrical as they are sincere. “My human desire,” Konchan writes, “is simple: / to live on the perpetual cusp / of extremity.”
Press

On I Am Not Guilty:
“A vivid and arresting novel of suspense, cleverly portraying the story of average human beings caught in the toils of murder.” – Ottawa Citizen

On Little Housewolf:
"Built on the plain pleasure of examining small domestic items and happenings, Little Housewolf

On The Family Way:
"The Family Way

On The Geography of Pluto:
“(The) book is so sharply written and so full of insights into the human condition… DiRaddo has crafted a fine book about one young gay man’s struggle to realize his first big relationship really is over while holding his mother’s hand as she struggles through a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Set in Montreal’s gay milieu in the 1990s, The Geography of Pluto

News

MAY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020, Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way, and Chad Campbell's Nectarine!

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, it's the publication of Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way! It's also National Poetry Month, so we are offering a Bundle of two new books, Little Housewolf by Medrie Purdham and Nectarine by Chad Campbell! Plus we welcome Carmine Starnino as our new Associate Publisher!

MARCH NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month we are featuring an autobiographical bundle by Kathy Dobson, and get a sneak peek of Medrie Perdham's forthcoming poetry debut Little Housewolf (out in May!)

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We celebrate Black History Month with the launch of Book of Wings by Tawhida Tanya Evanson and a special bundle of Book of Wings and Dominoes at the Crossroads. JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We launch Book of Wings by Tawhida Tanya Evanson; plus our Spring 2021 lineup and our Lockdown Fiction Bundle!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).