Mother Muse
Lorna Goodison

Lorna Goodison’s first poetry collection to be published in Canada in over nine years, Mother Muse heralds the return of a major voice. The poems in Goodison’s new book move boldly and range widely; here are praise songs alongside laments; autobiography shares pages with the collective past. In her exquisitely lyrical evocations of Jamaican lore and tradition, Goodison has always shown another side of history. While celebrating a wide cross-section of women—from Mahalia Jackson to Sandra Bland—Mother Muse focuses on two under-regarded “mothers” in Jamaican music: Sister Mary Ignatius, who nurtured many of Jamaica's most gifted musicians, and celebrated dancer Anita “Margarita” Mahfood. These important figures lead a collection of formidable scope and intelligence, one that seamlessly blends the personal and the political.

Words are the Worst
Erik Lindner

Born in 1968 in The Hague, Erik Lindner is one of the Netherland’s most acclaimed poets. Admired for a style that fuses simplicity with strangeness, Lindner builds his poems through a montage of descriptive images that, by fending off closure, generate extraordinary visionary power. Gathering together new work with a selection from his previous six collections, Words are the Worst offers a range of pleasures that have made him celebrated in his home country: an austere eloquence; a hard, unsparing precision; a restless and idiosyncratic eye. Best of all is how his intensely filmic observations transform haunted landscapes of windmills, birds, dogs and houseboats on canals into, as one critic put it, “Lindner-like” moments. Brilliantly translated by Francis R. Jones, with an introduction by Canadian poet David O’Meara, Words are the Worst introduces a leading Dutch voice to English readers.
The Strangest Dream
Merrily Weisbord

Lauded as the most eloquent book about Canadian communists and written like drama, The Strangest Dream animates the history and life of militants from the 1930's to the 1956 Khruschev revelations about Stalin.

Published originally in 1983, this Third Edition contains a new preface by the author, additional photographs, and previously unpublished letters.

An antidote to recurrent anti-communist vitriol, The Strangest Dream evokes not only the struggle "to make a better world," but the warmth, generosity, songs, theatre, art, and exhilaration of party members for whom comradeship meant a way of life. Merrily Weisbord's research and contacts unearth historical documents and rare testimonies, including that of Canada's only communist MP, and of the accused in the Cold War spy trials.

The Strangest Dream is witness to the heyday and legacy of Canadian communists’ courage and social conscience, and to the forces that destroyed their dreams.

Modern Home Winemaking
Daniel Pambianchi

Modern Home Winemaking describes the process of making flawless wine, consistently, from crush to bottle, using modern techniques and the latest products. Making wine is not only about fermenting juice into wine; this book details the many other processes involved in making outstanding wine—wines that will win medals at competitions.
The Family Way
Christopher DiRaddo

The year Paul turns forty, his friends Wendy and Eve ask him to help them get pregnant. Nothing about the process feels natural to him. But for a gay man of a certain age, making a family still means finding your own way through a world with few ready answers. The eighteen-month journey reveals many insights about Paul’s past and present, from his strained relationship to his father, his overprotective relationship with his partner Michael, and the many friends around him whom he considers his family.
Press

On Little Housewolf:
"Built on the plain pleasure of examining small domestic items and happenings, Little Housewolf

On Hallelujah Time:
“Urgent, whip-smart—each poem opens like shaken champagne.” —John Emil Vincent

“Konchan’s audacious, sophisticated, and valiant poems, fueled by their honest failure to outwit mourning, are a revelation.” —Catherine Wagner “Her work is flamboyant, but underlying the glitz is a serious engagement with how we create meaning out of a welter of experiences and influences.” —Barb Carey, Toronto Star

On Antonyms for Daughter:
"Quietly, in contemplation or more harrowing emotional drives, Boychuk's poems unravel the weight of a complicated relationship spanning their entwined lifetimes to expose the tendrils netted between a child and parent and the impossible-seeming task of disentangling oneself in the face of trauma and grief." – Montreal Review of Books

On
Fear the Mirror:
"The collection resonates with childhood recollections, poetry, historical references, and intriguing characters, not the least of whom are a strong-minded mother and an elusive grandmother. The memoirist narratives in this collection are rich in rhythms that reveal lives complicated by war, displacement, and immigration." – Montreal Review of Books

News

OCTOBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Fall books are here! Antonyms for Daughter by Jenny Boychuk, Open Your Heartby Alexie Morin, Fear the Mirrorby Cora Siré, and My Mother, My Translatorby Jaspreet Singh!

SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We launch Hallelujah Time by poet Virginia Konchan. Fall fiction from Esplanade Books features Cora Siré's Fear the Mirror and Aimee Wall's translation of Alexie Morin's Open Your Heart.

JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch Nectarine by Chad Campbell. Check out our Fall calendar and pre-order Jaspreet Singh's searing memoir My Mother, My Translator!

JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch Nectarine by Chad Campbell. Check out our and pre-order Jaspreet Singh's searing memoir My Mother, My Translator!MAY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020, Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way, and Chad Campbell's Nectarine!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).