Island of Trees
Bronwyn Chester

By following the trail of 50 trees, Bronwyn Chester presents a new perspective on the island of Montreal and offers a sense of belonging to an ancient forest, in its modern form. She goes beyond the traits defining each tree and interprets the tree's story. Each story is complemented with an illustration by Jean-Luc Trudel of the tree being discussed. The Island of Montreal has its own unique ecosystem. Insulated all around by the St. Lawrence River and the Rivière des Prairies, the island is slightly warmer than the surrounding territory, allowing species such as the giant cottonwood poplars to thrive all along the shoreline, and exotic species, such as the black walnut, tulip tree and dawn redwood to compliment the wide variety of native trees.

Bronwyn Chester wrote the weekly column Island of Trees for the Montreal Gazette and this book is an expansion of those columns. Grouped by territory, the trees selected will provide Montrealers and visitors the opportunity to not only better know and appreciate Montreal's trees, but will also lead them to little known places and histories of their island. These are stories that anchor us in time and space. Old trees connect us to the past as witnesses of bygone eras.
The Scarborough
Michael Lista

The Scarborourgh takes place over three days in 1992: Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday—the weekend 15-year-old Kristin French was abducted and murdered by Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. In poems both opulent and stricken, ravishing and unflinching, Michael Lista—nine, at the time—revisits those dates, haunted by the horrifying facts he now possesses. Inspired, in part, by Dante’s Inferno, Virgil's tale of Orpheus’ descent into the underworld for Eurydice, as well as the Bernardo trial itself—where the judge ruled that the gallery could hear the video tapes of the crimes, but not see them—Lista’s poems adhere to a single rule: you cannot gaze at the beloved you seek to rescue. The Scarborourgh is book about Bernardo that doesn’t show us Bernardo, a conceptual project that ignores its concept. Shiveringly bold, it is a major achievement.


Praise for Bloom:

"There aren't many Canadian books of poetry that are anticipated with quite so much excitement as Michael Lista's debut, which has been the talk of the town for some time. But the book outpaces the expectations even of those kindly disposed to it.”—Quill and Quire (which named Bloom a Book of the Year)

“Lista has here brought together potent ingredients, at once harmonious and dissonant, in a container with metal enough to withstand blasts from poems being split apart and reincarnated.”—The Globe and Mail

“A brilliant, erudite new voice on the Canadian poetry scene."—Montreal Gazette
The Mayor of Côte St. Paul
Ronald Cooke

Rum running between Montreal and Windsor in the 40s.


A novel about Montreal during the not-so-halcyon era of a couple of decades ago when gangs and girls made rum-running and slot machines big business.
–from the 1950 edition

Ronald J. Cooke’s second novel, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul is the tale of a struggling writer living in Depression-era Montreal. Winnipegger Dave Manley arrived in the city thinking that its rich atmosphere will inspire his fiction, but was met by a stream rejection slips. His luck turns, for good and bad, when he meets Cherie, a looker from Lunenberg who does dirty work for a crime boss known as The Mayor. It isn’t long before Dave is running booze between Montreal and Windsor, learning all there is to know about the slot machine and liquor rackets.

Dave wants out, Cherie wants out—but there is no easy escape from The Mayor, a man who lives in luxury derived from vice and murder, surrounded by the squalor of Côte St. Paul.

Published in 1950, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul enjoyed the month of June on newsstands, never to be seen again. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty-four years.

The Long November
James Benson Nablo

It descends with a challenge upon the censors, and yet this powerful story had to be told, for it is so much a part of a struggling, impetuous generation of youth in Canada. It is sometimes brazen, sometimes explosive, always face to face with gripping reality, shocking as that may be to those who shy away from life’s more lurid facets.
- from the first paperback edition

First published in 1946, The Long November enjoyed six different editions in nine years, making it one of the best selling Canadian novels of the post-war period. Its last appearance, as a pirated paperback, speaks to its reputation as a gritty, raw and ribald story that few publishers dared touch. This new edition is the first in sixty-seven years.

The Long November is the story Joe Mack, son of the grittier side of Cataract City – Niagara Falls – and his struggles to make something of himself; all for the love of well-to-do blonde beauty Steffie Gibson. It’s about rum running booze, Chicago beer trucks, Bay Street sharpshooters, the mines of Northern Ontario and fighting the Nazis in Italy. It’s also about the women, the many women - married, unmarried and widowed – who shares Joe’s bed. But they mean nothing – it’s Steffie he wants.
Radio Weather
Shoshanna Wingate

Radio Weather explores the tension between personal imperatives and fickle outside forces in taut, unsentimental, immaculately constructed poems. Wingate tracks the moments that alter us from who we might have been to who we are, in narratives of rural poverty, urban decay, a child’s improbable friendship with a murderer, a father’s death from AIDS. “The days depart in minor steps,” she writes, “then slip away for costume change.” Radio Weather is a memorable debut by a poet of exceptional promise.

Advance Praise for Radio Weather:

“Clear-eyed, musical, deeply-considered and deeply-felt, Radio Weather contends with the inhospitable. Bringing both child and adult perspectives to bear, it calls to account both the living and the dead. Brilliantly-crafted and wise, occupying a provisional space that is both wary and compassionate, somewhere ‘between what we didn’t want and what we could afford,’ these are poems of great psychological tension, poems for grown ups.” —Patrick Warner, author of Perfection
Press

On Satisfying Clicking Sound:
"Poet and critic Jason Guriel solidifies his place in CanLit with substantial contributions to both fields. . . Most of Guriel's poems open outward, including insight, mischief and wordplay." –Quill & Quire

On The Long November:
"If this is modern 'realistic writing,' this reviewer will take vanilla." – John D. Paulus, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On Dog Ear:
“There is a lot to admire in Patternicity: musicality, intelligence, toughness, tensile juxtapositions of rational enquiry and lyrical tenderness.”—Arc Poetry Magazine

News

Congratulations to Esplanade author, Guillaume Morissette. His novel New Tab is shortlisted for the 2014 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Our colleague Kitty Lewis at Brick Books receives Honourary Life Membership Award from the League of Canadian Poets.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Fall 2014 Titles
Check out our new catalogue for Fall 2014!

Winkler wins 2013 Governor General's Literary Award!
Marston wins 2013 Ottawa Book Award!
Congratulations to Donald Winkler winner of the GG Translation prize for The Major Verbs by Pierre Nepveu,and to Missy Marston, winner of the Ottawa Book Award for Fiction for her novel The Love Monster.

Events

Montreal Mystique: George Ellenbogen, A Stone in My Shoe
Monday 24th November 2014 at 8:00 pm



Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).