Rock 'n' Radio
Ian Howarth

Rock ‘n’ Radio illustrates that Montreal was at the epicentre of the rock radio revolution in Canada, eventually attracting talented DJs from the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Their personal stories and the inevitable collision with the power of alternative FM rock radio in the late 60s take the reader through some of the best rock music recorded and the social changes that percolated in the background.

The period 1926 to 1949 can be considered the Golden Age of radio when it was the hearth of the North American family. Much to everyone's surprise, it survived the incursion of television to live another Golden Age—the 1960s and 1970s when rock 'n' roll music seeped its way onto mainstream radio, pushing aside Perry Como and the Dorsey Brothers for Elvis and The Beatles.

The new golden era of radio spawned what would eventually be called Top 40 AM radio, whose premise was built on the philosophy: play all the hits, then play them again. Pioneer Top 40 DJs like Alan Freed in the U.S., widely recognized as the man who coined the phrase "rock 'n' roll," spawned a new breed of radio personalities—the fast-talking salesman who delivered the goods. Hundreds of radio stations in North American gave up their entire programming day over to rock music. And with that came a legion of young, hungry Top 40 DJs such as Dave Boxer, Ralph Lockwood and Doug Pringle, looking for jobs at stations across Canada.
Gambling with Fire
David Montrose

Montreal’s glittering, ruthless, post-war underworld.

Austrian aristocrat Franz Loebek lands in Canada penniless, having lost everything in the violent upheavals brought by the Second World War. In Montreal he finds the Old World sophistication of London and Paris mixed with the youthful vibrancy of New York. But Loebek’s adopted city is an open city, and he unwillingly becomes drawn into the violent underworld of illegal gambling, all the while maintaining a front as he moves amongst Montreal’s most privileged. Gambling with Fire is the story of one man’s struggle to navigate illicit and dangerous waters to finally find stability and peace.
Originally published in 1969, Gambling with Fire followed The Crime on Cote des Neiges (1951), Murder Over Dorval (1952) and Body on Mount Royal (1953) as David Montrose’s fourth and final novel. The author died while it was in production. This Ricochet Books edition, the first in forty-seven years, marks its paperback debut.
Late Victorians
Vincent Colistro

Sense-resisting parables full of deranged twists and dizzying embellishments.

“I was only born into the world,” begins one of Vincent Colistro’s poems, “didn’t invade it, didn’t ransom it for a nicer one.” The Late Victorians, Colistro’s debut, is a beguilingly irreverent investigation of the life he was “born into.” Hyper-fluent, riding wave after wave of copious invention, Colistro builds his weirdness from scratch, turning simple ideas into sense-resisting parables full of deranged twists and dizzying embellishments. (“We Rick-rolled, we raised / pre-flop, we flapped our pool noodles / at each other’s caboose.”) Wily, witty and packed with brilliant sleights of hand, The Late Victorians announces an original talent.

Advance Praise:

The Late Victorians re-sets the machinery. The voice here is way beyond chatter; these narratives arrive cock-eyed because they take place just adjacent to life's usual misery. Vincent Colistro's poems have things to tell us, slantwise, manic, wry, desperate, dishevelled, and stylish.” –Ken Babstock, author of On Malice

“Dashing and brilliant, Vincent Colistro's Late Victorians is an unforgettable book of poetry about leaving youth behind to assemble a complete, fortified rhetoric full of catchy riffs and hilarious, precise revelations.” –David McGimpsey, author of Asbestos Heights
Wrestling with Colonialism on Steroids
Zebedee Nungak

For decades, the Inuit of northern Québec were among the most neglected people in Canada. It took The Battle of James Bay, 1971-1975, for the governments in Québec City and Ottawa to wake up to the disgrace.

In this concise, lively account, Zebedee Nungak relates the inside story of how the young Inuit and Cree “Davids” took action when Québec began construction on the giant James Bay hydro project. They fought in court and at the negotiation table for an accord that effectively became Canada’s first land-claims agreement. Nungak’s account is accompanied by his essays on Nunavik history. Together they provide a fascinating insight into a virtually unknown chapter of Canadian history.
Sun of a Distant Land
David Bouchet

Twelve-year-old Souleye has just immigrated to Montreal from Senegal with his family. He wants to become “from here” as quickly as possible, but Canada and Senegal prove to be two completely different worlds, and their new lives don’t unfold as planned. Beyond the daily grind of finding an apartment, schools, and jobs, young Souleye (whose only friend renames him “Soleil” – Sun) has to contend with what it means to be black in a predominantly white society, a foreigner among the locals. And that’s all before his father’s mind begins to fall apart…

Poignantly translated from the French by Claire Holden Rothman, David Bouchet’s Sun of a Distant Land is by turns charming and tragic, an epic contemporary vision of what it means to be uprooted, and what it takes to plant roots in a new land.
Press

On Hungary-Hollywood Express:
“A portrait and kaleidoscope of a character who is truer than life.” –Josée Lapointe, La Presse

On Stranger:
“We’re all strangers, even if we think we know each other. Poet Nyla Matuk artfully meditates on our disconnected digital age, while awakening a sensuality to this vulnerable state of unknowing… [She] creates space for the mundane hum of the every day, and opens towards a sense of curiosity. Stranger harnesses the unknown within, and makes it safe to uncover an estranged self.” -Shannon Webb-Campbell, Montreal Review of Books

On The Body on Mount Royal:
"They’re cheap, gritty, good reads, and they feel like home. ""–Katia Grubisic

On Model Disciple:
The strengths of the collection reside in movement, and Prior’s ability to generate one image and end up somewhere surprising. –Micheline Maylor, The Quill & Quire.

News

D.G. Jones
Poet-teacher-literary translator D.G. Jones has died at 87. Twice winner of the Governor General’s Literary Prize, and of other prizes, he was a formidable poet and pioneered the translation of Québec poetry.
In 2009 we were privileged to publish his collected poems, The Stream Exposed with All Its Stones.

Congratulations to Andy Sinclair
His novel Breathing Lessons is a Gay Fiction finalist for the 2016 Lambda Literary Awards. The awards ceremony will take place in New York, June 6.

Paul Bley
1932-2016
We are saddened by the January 3 passing of renowned jazz pianist Paul Bley, at 83. Born in Montreal he played and recorded with Lester Young, Ben Webster, Sonny Rollins, Charles Mingus, Paul Motian, Pat Metheny and many others. We were proud to publish his memoir Stopping Time: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz and Paul Bley: The Logic of Chance by Arrigo Cappelletti.

Niko
Dimitri Nasrallah’s novel, Niko, makes the CBC Canada Reads Longlist.Swing in the House
Anita Anand is nominated for the Blue Metropolis/Conseil des arts du Montréal Literary Diversity Prize for a First Publication.
Discover

Mary Dalton celebrates the language and culture of Newfoundland on The Next Chapter.

Shoshanna Wingate interviewed on Irish radio about Radio Weather.

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).