Hot Freeze
Douglas Sanderson

It was cold; bitterly paralysingly cold. There was a dampness in the air that bit into the marrow of your bones and stayed there. The red in the thermometer was below zero and still dropping steadily, and the weather forecasts offered no immediate hope of a let up. The city lay rigid under the stiffening blanket of snow. The air as you breathed it felt solid.

A raw novel of sex and drugs in the years just before rock’n’roll,Hot Freeze moves from the highest Westmount mansion to the lowest Montreal gambling joint and nightclubs. Its hero is Mike Garfin, a man who got kicked out of the rcmp for sleeping with the wife of a suspect. Recreating himself as an “inquiry agent”, Mike takes on what looks to be an easy job, shadowing a bisexual teenaged son of privilege who is throwing around more money than his allowance allows. But the boy disappears. Others soon follow, and Garfin’s world becomes a lonelier place.

First published in February 1954 as a Dodd, Mead Red Detective Mystery title,Hot Freeze enjoyed second and third lives as a Reinhardt hardcover and a Popular Library paperback. In 1955 a French translation, Mon cadavre au Canada, became part of Gallimard’s Serie noir. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty years.
Health Care and Politics
David Levine

Drawing on his experience from forty years running many Canadian health care institutions, David Levine shares his expertise on management in this very complex environment. His career includes implementing one of the first Local Community Health Centres (CLSCs) in Montreal in the 1970s, involvement in electoral politics, managing various Québec hospitals, his controversial hiring as Head of the Ottawa Hospital, a term as Québec Delegate General in New York City, a stint as Junior Minister of Health in Québec, and running the Montreal regional health authority under both Parti-Québécois and Liberal governments.

His experience with politics—both personal and professional—is the basis of his analysis of the impact of politics on health care. Levine supports without qualification a Public, Universal Health Care System, but he questions the effectiveness of managing the system from the Minister’s Office. Poor decision-making on the basis of politics often means best solutions are not implemented.

Levine’s analysis includes what is not working and how to fix it, and the barriers to implementation.

Health Care and Politics will be of interest to health care managers, health care policy makers, and all Canadians seeking a better understanding of the health care system and what it will take to fix it.
The Mayor of Côte St. Paul
Ronald Cooke

Rum running between Montreal and Windsor in the 40s.


A novel about Montreal during the not-so-halcyon era of a couple of decades ago when gangs and girls made rum-running and slot machines big business.
–from the 1950 edition

Ronald J. Cooke’s second novel, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul is the tale of a struggling writer living in Depression-era Montreal. Winnipegger Dave Manley arrived in the city thinking that its rich atmosphere will inspire his fiction, but was met by a stream rejection slips. His luck turns, for good and bad, when he meets Cherie, a looker from Lunenberg who does dirty work for a crime boss known as The Mayor. It isn’t long before Dave is running booze between Montreal and Windsor, learning all there is to know about the slot machine and liquor rackets.

Dave wants out, Cherie wants out—but there is no easy escape from The Mayor, a man who lives in luxury derived from vice and murder, surrounded by the squalor of Côte St. Paul.

Published in 1950, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul enjoyed the month of June on newsstands, never to be seen again. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty-four years.

Radio Weather
Shoshanna Wingate

Radio Weather explores the tension between personal imperatives and fickle outside forces in taut, unsentimental, immaculately constructed poems. Wingate tracks the moments that alter us from who we might have been to who we are, in narratives of rural poverty, urban decay, a child’s improbable friendship with a murderer, a father’s death from AIDS. “The days depart in minor steps,” she writes, “then slip away for costume change.” Radio Weather is a memorable debut by a poet of exceptional promise.

Advance Praise for Radio Weather:

“Clear-eyed, musical, deeply-considered and deeply-felt, Radio Weather contends with the inhospitable. Bringing both child and adult perspectives to bear, it calls to account both the living and the dead. Brilliantly-crafted and wise, occupying a provisional space that is both wary and compassionate, somewhere ‘between what we didn’t want and what we could afford,’ these are poems of great psychological tension, poems for grown ups.” —Patrick Warner, author of Perfection
The Veiled Sun
Paul Schaffer

The Veiled Sun is a Holocaust memoir written in a highly literate style. Paul Schaffer spent his teenage years on the run from the Nazis in Austria, Belgium and France, and then in Auschwitz from 1942 to 1945. He survived to become a successful industrialist who was honoured by the government of France. Paul Schaffer’s story provides insights into a middle-class Jewish childhood in pre-war Vienna, attitudes to Jewish refugees in Vichy France, arrest and detention in France, survival in Auschwitz, and the return to post-war France to face the challenges of re-integration into French society.

Published with the support of the Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah.
Press

On The Veiled Sun:
The restraint and authenticity of Paul Schaffer’s account make the message he conveys all the more valuable. There is no doubt that Paul will evoke the same empathy in his readers as he does in the students to whom he has spoken so often. To both, he provides an example of a young man who, despite the humiliations and afflictions he endured in the concentration camp, was able to remain a human being. For the image he conveys of the survivors, for his confidence in humanity that he was able to retain, he deserves our thanks.–Simone Veil

On Swing in the House and Other Stories:
These stories are full of undercurrents that disturb the surface, and these disturbances, in their turn, dazzle as they reflect light. Anita Anand is a sensitive observer of human behaviour and, because she is unafraid to explore difficult emotions, her stories reveal–in broad strokes and subtle shadings–glimpses of truth.
–Elise Moser, author of Lily and Taylor

On Breathing Lessons:
Readers will recognize themselves in these scenes, even when they least want to. I’m not exaggerating when I say that, with Breathing Lessons

News

Talya Rubin, reading from her new book, Leaving the Island, won the 2015 Poetry Now Battle of the Bards. Listen to her performance.  http://ifoa.org/podcasts/winner-talya-rubin-reads-at-poetry-now

Guillaume Morissette’s novel New Tab is a finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. The Awards ceremony is May 21 in Toronto.

Spring 2015
Check out our new catalogue for Spring 2015!

Congratulations to Esplanade author, Guillaume Morissette. His novel New Tab is shortlisted for the 2014 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).