Dante's House
Richard Greene

Richard Greene's first collection since winning the 2010 Governor-General's Award for Poetry, take as their subject the rumors, misunderstandings and half-truths that often comprise our knowledge of others. With an astonishing gift for capturing states of feeling, Greene's new poems movingly reflect on the "presence and absence, glory and disarray" of our flawed life, moving from his mother's oil paintings to harrowing conditions at a corrections facility to recollections of a much-loved mentor. The capstone of the book is the magnificent title poem. Written in fluent, colloquial terza rima and set in sun-drenched Siena during the frenzied pageantry of Il Palio-the Italian city's bi-annual horse race-it is a brilliant, beautifully realized achievement that consolidates Greene's reputation as an emerging master of narrative verse.
Island of Trees
Bronwyn Chester

By following the trail of 50 trees, Bronwyn Chester presents a new perspective on the island of Montreal and offers a sense of belonging to an ancient forest, in its modern form. She goes beyond the traits defining each tree and interprets the tree's story. Each story is complemented with an illustration by Jean-Luc Trudel of the tree being discussed. The Island of Montreal has its own unique ecosystem. Insulated all around by the St. Lawrence River and the Rivière des Prairies, the island is slightly warmer than the surrounding territory, allowing species such as the giant cottonwood poplars to thrive all along the shoreline, and exotic species, such as the black walnut, tulip tree and dawn redwood to compliment the wide variety of native trees.

Bronwyn Chester wrote the weekly column Island of Trees for the Montreal Gazette and this book is an expansion of those columns. Grouped by territory, the trees selected will provide Montrealers and visitors the opportunity to not only better know and appreciate Montreal's trees, but will also lead them to little known places and histories of their island. These are stories that anchor us in time and space. Old trees connect us to the past as witnesses of bygone eras.
Satisfying Clicking Sound
Jason Guriel

Satisfying Clicking Sound is a book that’s never afraid to make a show of itself. In his third collection, Jason Guriel gives us a quick-thinking colloquial style that segues deftly from deadpan wit to deep emotion. Like the hard-to-master knuckleball he celebrates as “less spun / than blown / out onto the air, / its course unknown,” Guriel’s poetry is equal parts art, talent, luck, and mystery. Consistently rewarding, Satisfying Clicking Sound is a quicksilver performance from one of Canadian poetry’s most distinctive new voices.
The Scarborough
Michael Lista

The Scarborourgh takes place over three days in 1992: Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday—the weekend 15-year-old Kristin French was abducted and murdered by Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. In poems both opulent and stricken, ravishing and unflinching, Michael Lista—nine, at the time—revisits those dates, haunted by the horrifying facts he now possesses. Inspired, in part, by Dante’s Inferno, Virgil's tale of Orpheus’ descent into the underworld for Eurydice, as well as the Bernardo trial itself—where the judge ruled that the gallery could hear the video tapes of the crimes, but not see them—Lista’s poems adhere to a single rule: you cannot gaze at the beloved you seek to rescue. The Scarborourgh is book about Bernardo that doesn’t show us Bernardo, a conceptual project that ignores its concept. Shiveringly bold, it is a major achievement.


Praise for Bloom:

"There aren't many Canadian books of poetry that are anticipated with quite so much excitement as Michael Lista's debut, which has been the talk of the town for some time. But the book outpaces the expectations even of those kindly disposed to it.”—Quill and Quire (which named Bloom a Book of the Year)

“Lista has here brought together potent ingredients, at once harmonious and dissonant, in a container with metal enough to withstand blasts from poems being split apart and reincarnated.”—The Globe and Mail

“A brilliant, erudite new voice on the Canadian poetry scene."—Montreal Gazette
New Tab
Guillaume Morissette

Set in Montreal, New Tab spans a year in the life of a twenty-six year old videogame designer as he attempts to reset his life, in the process chronicling with humor disillusion, boredom, self-destruction, Facebook chats, Concordia University, bilingualism, good parties, bad parties, a backyard cinema, social anxiety and running a possibly illegal DIY venue.

Written in a simple yet bold and astonishing style, New Tab is a profoundly intimate tale of self-reinvention and ambiguous relationships. A sharp, funny, modern novel from one of the most unique new writers in Canada.
Press

On New Tab:
Inventive works of fiction like New Tab, on the other hand, can go where “Scarlett Johansson” and “Johnny Depp” simply cannot go—down to the messy, abject, and irresolvable dilemmas of our digitalizing desire. It’s full of glitches, and it’s pretty cold, unlike some of those steamy and streamlined sex machines of yore. But for now it’s all we’ve got.  –Henry Adam Svec, Motherboard/Vice

On Global Poetry Anthology 2013:
"The anthology contains more than one “Hell yeah!” poetry moment – the kind of poem that avid poetry readers can use to argue poetry’s merits to the unconverted." – Montreal Review of Books

On A Stone in My Shoe:
George Ellenbogen is a cartographer of the heart and of the memories it contains… In describing his fondness for the work of French painter Édouard Vuillard, Ellenbogen explains that the artist experiments “with ways of seeing, ways of knowing.” As a work of art and a family genealogy, A Stone in My Shoe experiments with this approach by navigating the past with love, abundance, and literary resonance. --Deanna Radford, Montreal Review of Books

News

Our colleague Kitty Lewis at Brick Books receives Honourary Life Membership Award from the League of Canadian Poets.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Fall 2014 Titles
Check out our new catalogue for Fall 2014!

Winkler wins 2013 Governor General's Literary Award!
Marston wins 2013 Ottawa Book Award!
Congratulations to Donald Winkler winner of the GG Translation prize for The Major Verbs by Pierre Nepveu,and to Missy Marston, winner of the Ottawa Book Award for Fiction for her novel The Love Monster.

Congratulations
Marc Callanan, author of Gift Horse, won the 2013 Heritage and History Book Award for Poetry.

Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).