Of Jesuits and Bohemians
Jean-Claude Germain

Jean-Claude Germain’s second volume of Montreal memoirs chronicles his coming of age: his draconian Jesuit education on the fringes of the city’s Red Light District, followed by his liberating discovery of the city’s fevered bohemian community in the dying days of the Duplessis regime and Quebec’s “grande noirceur.” Here, on the cusp between two worlds, we meet fire-breathing clerics intent on putting the fear of God into young souls, and writers, painters, theatre directors and performers, determined at all costs, and at great sacrifice, to transform the society in which they live. It is this creative ferment that instils in the young Jean-Claude a passion for and a belief in artistic endeavour that will sustain him through all the years that lie in wait.
Leaving the Island
Talya Rubin

St. Kilda is a barren, rocky archipelago 60 km off the west coast of Scotland. In 1930, harsh conditions led the islands’ remaining 36 inhabitants to relocate to the mainland. Left behind were seabirds and a population of feral sheep. In Leaving the Island, her first poetry collection, Talya Rubin enters the isolated lives of those last Kildareans, and probes the “desert places”—to use Frost’s phrase—in herself. Written during a series of extended trips abroad, including stays in Australia and Greece, Rubin’s poems return, again and again, to a psychological landscape where “mud and rock / and sea and salt and oily smell / of fish and fowl is all, all.” Rife with exacting wordplay and frank self-reckonings, Leaving the Island is a book about endings and what remains when we start over.
Radio Weather
Shoshanna Wingate

Radio Weather explores the tension between personal imperatives and fickle outside forces in taut, unsentimental, immaculately constructed poems. Wingate tracks the moments that alter us from who we might have been to who we are, in narratives of rural poverty, urban decay, a child’s improbable friendship with a murderer, a father’s death from AIDS. “The days depart in minor steps,” she writes, “then slip away for costume change.” Radio Weather is a memorable debut by a poet of exceptional promise.

Advance Praise for Radio Weather:

“Clear-eyed, musical, deeply-considered and deeply-felt, Radio Weather contends with the inhospitable. Bringing both child and adult perspectives to bear, it calls to account both the living and the dead. Brilliantly-crafted and wise, occupying a provisional space that is both wary and compassionate, somewhere ‘between what we didn’t want and what we could afford,’ these are poems of great psychological tension, poems for grown ups.” —Patrick Warner, author of Perfection
Faith Under Fire
Alan Hustak

If Frederick Scott is remembered at all today, it is as minor Victorian poet or as the father of his illustrious son F.R. Scott. However, Frederick Scott was almost 55 years old and the pastor of St. Matthews Anglican Church in Quebec City when he volunteered to go overseas to serve as senior chaplain with the 1st Canadian Infantry Division during the First World War. The depth of his faith was tested when he lost a son at the Battle of the Somme. Through a series of unpublished letters in the McCord Museum, author Alan Hustak tells the powerful and absorbing story of a man revered by the Canadian military for his remarkable ministry. One admiring private recalled, “No matter how thick the fight, he is always to be seen wherever the boys are. … to see men dying all around you, all dying for principle, it hardens a man, and at the same times softens him.’ His letters home from the front reveals how Scott discovered first-hand what fear really is, how to conquer it and how to inspire others.
Hot Freeze
Douglas Sanderson

It was cold; bitterly paralysingly cold. There was a dampness in the air that bit into the marrow of your bones and stayed there. The red in the thermometer was below zero and still dropping steadily, and the weather forecasts offered no immediate hope of a let up. The city lay rigid under the stiffening blanket of snow. The air as you breathed it felt solid.

A raw novel of sex and drugs in the years just before rock’n’roll,Hot Freeze moves from the highest Westmount mansion to the lowest Montreal gambling joint and nightclubs. Its hero is Mike Garfin, a man who got kicked out of the rcmp for sleeping with the wife of a suspect. Recreating himself as an “inquiry agent”, Mike takes on what looks to be an easy job, shadowing a bisexual teenaged son of privilege who is throwing around more money than his allowance allows. But the boy disappears. Others soon follow, and Garfin’s world becomes a lonelier place.

First published in February 1954 as a Dodd, Mead Red Detective Mystery title,Hot Freeze enjoyed second and third lives as a Reinhardt hardcover and a Popular Library paperback. In 1955 a French translation, Mon cadavre au Canada, became part of Gallimard’s Serie noir. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty years.
Press

On Breathing Lessons:
Readers will recognize themselves in these scenes, even when they least want to. I’m not exaggerating when I say that, with Breathing Lessons

On Laws & Locks:


On Swing in the House and Other Stories:
These stories are full of undercurrents that disturb the surface, and these disturbances, in their turn, dazzle as they reflect light. Anita Anand is a sensitive observer of human behaviour and, because she is unafraid to explore difficult emotions, her stories reveal–in broad strokes and subtle shadings–glimpses of truth.
–Elise Moser, author of Lily and Taylor

News

Talya Rubin, reading from her new book, Leaving the Island, won the 2015 Poetry Now Battle of the Bards. Listen to her performance.  http://ifoa.org/podcasts/winner-talya-rubin-reads-at-poetry-now

Guillaume Morissette’s novel New Tab is a finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. The Awards ceremony is May 21 in Toronto.

Spring 2015
Check out our new catalogue for Spring 2015!

Congratulations to Esplanade author, Guillaume Morissette. His novel New Tab is shortlisted for the 2014 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Events

Esplanade Spring Launch
Wednesday 6th May 2015 at 7:00 pm



Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).